SW Florida Snook Fishing Tips

Florida Snook Fishing Tips

 

Snook Fishing TipsSnook fishing is one of the greatest saltwater fishing experiences that any angler can have, especially in the Southwest Florida region of the United States. Hands-down, hooking into one of these fantastic fighting and not so easy to catch line-siders either in the surf or under a bridge is a test of both fishing skills and patience. In order to learn about some great snook fishing techniques and tips one needs to understand that patience is involved in almost all inshore salt water fishing adventures. When it comes to tracking down such an intelligent and crafty specimen as the Southwest Florida snook, an angler needs all the assistance that is readily available these days.

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Ambush Predators

Snook are ambush predators and as much will prefer to hide away and wait for prey items to either flow by or come within their site/hearing/lateral-line sensory perception for an explosive smash that happens in a blink of an eye. Snook are powerful predators and are normally top of the food chain in their respective areas, unless it is surf fishing where there are 10 foot lemons and black tip sharks! These larger predators which patrol 10 to 15 feet behind the waves of the surf will easily snap up a snook if given the opportunity. Snook normally do not give the sharks of SW Florida a chance as we stated earlier and throughout these reviews, snook are not dumb. The surfing snook that are eyeballing the breakers for baitfish are normally at the top of their game and the food-chain, and the sharks normally are just giant lumbering objects that are from birth seen as objects to steer way clear of.

Shiniest Spoon in the Box

A great tip for catching snook is to use the shiniest spoon in the tackle box and begin star casting in a fan-like manner with a relatively fast rate of return. In other words cast out numerous times in all directions and crank that Johnson or Key West lure in as fast as you possibly can. This will take care of two birds with one stone so to speak. It will first locate the most active snook, if there are any snook in the area, and also will get the attention of any nearby snook that will hopefully come and investigate what all the commotion is about. That’s another issue about snook and a characteristic that many snook fishermen find very interesting indeed for an ambush predator.

University of Florida Research

Southwest Florida snook from the 10,000 Islands all the way to Venice Beach have been seen physically inspecting the commotion of a testing lure that was placed in the water by University of Florida marine biologists. What the researchers wanted to know was to what extent would the area snook of a Southwest Florida mangrove swamp go to in order to inspect any auditory and visual commotion, and what would their reaction be when the distress signal was brought into view? The results of that study found that snook that were in the area, and could pick up on the distress signals in the water made by the testing hookless lures, would come and investigate nearly 50% of the time.

Come to Investigate

The overall results from that research study proved that one out of two SW Florida snook, when picking up on the distress signals of a wounded or not so quiet bait-fish, will elicit the natural investigative responses of a Gulf of Mexico snook. The normal sounds of a lure or live bait being slapped down on the surface will be enough to warrant an investigation by an inquisitive snook, some of the time. The other 50% of the SW Florida snook need to be found, and that’s when snook fishing becomes an art form.

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